“The mythology is hold your nose and vote for the lesser evil and things will get better.

“Lesser evil” politicians have been speaking for us and they are bought and paid for by their corporate influences consisting of “predatory banks, the fossil fuel giants, the war profiteers and the health insurance industry.”

— Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein speaking during a campaign appearance at First Churches in Northampton Sept. 18, 2016
Photo by Kevin Gutting- The Valley Advocate

 

Photo Credit, Kevin Gutting for the Daily Hampshire Gazette, September 19, 2016

Photo Credit, Kevin Gutting for the Daily Hampshire Gazette, September 19, 2016

Story by Luis Feldman for The Gazette
NORTHAMPTON — Green-Rainbow Party nominee for president Jill Stein spoke at the First Churches in Northampton on Sunday night with a message: Vote for the greater good, not the lesser evil.

At an event co-sponsored by the Green-Rainbow Party and the International Socialist Organization of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, nearly 400 people heard the third-party candidate’s proposal for earning their votes in the general election Nov. 8.

“There are four candidates, not just two candidates, in this election, and the two major-party candidates have been rejected at the highest levels of distrust and dislike ever in our history, and people are clamoring for other choices,” Stein said.

She claimed that nearly one-third of Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton’s supporters do not actually support her for president but rather are voting for her to keep Republican Donald Trump from winning the presidency.

“The mythology is hold your nose and vote for the lesser evil and things will get better,” Stein said.

“Lesser evil” politicians have been speaking for us, she said, and they are bought and paid for by their corporate influences consisting of “predatory banks, the fossil fuel giants, the war profiteers and the health insurance industry.”

The national student debt in this country is another key issue for Stein, who says she believes that if she can enfranchise the millennial generation to vote for her, she would turn this election on its head.

She concedes that winning would take a tremendous effort, especially with polls showing the election a tight race between Clinton and Trump, but she says her proposed policy of forgiving the nation’s student loan debt could make her a more competitive candidate.

According to a recent poll done by CBS News with The New York Times last week, Stein is polling at 4 percent nationally, but she hopes her stance on eliminating the student debt and her promises on creating immediate climate change will appeal to 43 million young people of the millennial generation.

Although it’s an uphill struggle, Stein, who ran for president in 2012 also and has run twice for governor of Massachusetts, promised she is “going all the way this election.”

Claiming that 72 percent of voters in this country do not even know about her campaign, Stein said mainstream media have failed to do their job of informing voters.

She will not be included in the Sept. 26 presidential debate being held at Hofstra University in New York — though she said she will be there — and she says voters will miss out on the issues she is campaigning on such as the pressing issues of climate change and the need to transition from fossil fuels to clean, renewable sources of energy.

“In this election we are not just deciding what kind of a world we will be, but whether or not we will be a world going forward,” she said in terms of the possibility of sea levels rising as much as 9 feet by the year 2050.

She said action must be taken now to save our planet and claimed that a vote for her is a step in that direction.